Missouri Police: Boy With Broken Back Needed ‘Subdued’, Tasered 19 Times

The news is full of these stories which go underreported by the national media. A boy is walking along a highway, and concerned motorists call the police, afraid he may be struck by a car. When the police arrive on the scene, the boy has apparently fallen off an overpass and broken his back on the ground below. The injured boy was supposedly saying “kill cops”, and was “not complying”, so he needed “subdued”. 19 times, with 50,000 volts of electricity. Is it in any way conceivable that someone with a broken back, whether they’re shouting death threats or not, is an actual threat to your person? Are you afraid of being chased and shot by a boy, lying on the ground with a broken back? No, this was outright punishment before conviction, for something which isn’t even a crime. This is the police acting like judge, jury, and executioner. This is the federal funding and military training of your local police at work. This is why our predecessors enacted Posse Comitatus. These are “standing armies” quartered among us. Read the Declaration of Independence.

Here’s the video of the news report:

This is not an isolated case. On the permanent page, Police Brutality and Militarism, I chronicle a few of the many stories across our country of police stepping out of line.

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~ by skepsis on July 29, 2008.

3 Responses to “Missouri Police: Boy With Broken Back Needed ‘Subdued’, Tasered 19 Times”

  1. How were police supposed to know he had a broken back if he was walking along making threats against them? Hindsight is always 20-20. Making split second judgments based on incomplete information is not.

  2. I don’t know about you, but I’ve never seen anyone “walking along making threats” with a newly-broken back.

    I quote from the video: “By the time officers arrived, the teen was off the overpass, lying on the shoulder below, along Highway 65”.

    The boy was lying on the ground where he fell, not walking around. It would have been incredibly apparent that the boy was hurt. He needed “immediate surgery”. And since he wouldn’t (couldn’t) stand up and get out of traffic, they tasered him, which weakened his system and delayed his “immediate surgery” by two days.

    So who is making “split second judgments based on incomplete information”? Watch the video again, and pay attention to the details. He was lying on the side of the highway below the overpass off of which he just fell. He was not cavorting around threatening police, he was most likely paralyzed, but if not he was most certainly paralyzed from the pain. In any case, it could not be construed by any stretch of the imagination, even if the boy was saying, “I will kill you” instead of making vague threats, that there was any threat of immediate harm to the officer. I could see charging him with threatening them, but tasering an injured individual, even once, is out of line. Do you realize what 50,000 volts can do to your heart with just one shock? Add to that the shock his body just experienced and you’re lucky he’s not dead (read my page that I link to in the article to see examples where people routinely die from these “nonlethal” weapons).

    And then they tasered him eighteen more times. Sickening.

  3. Didn’t watch the video, only read your and another’s blog posting from which, when taken together, I got the impression he was up and about (as the original calls to police said he was walking and he only fell after these); hence I found it hard to believe he could be walking around with these injuries.

    If he was lying on the ground then that’s obviously different.

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